Visit our CRECHE Center in Dabbagudem

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Nail cutting (weekly) by CRECHE worker.

Children playing in CRECHE Centre

Children dancing with Teacher

Prof: Ratan Mulchandani,(NRI) Software Developer,NIARI CONSULTANCY SERVICES Pvt; lTD; Australia posing with tribal child in Centre.

Sileru River

Prof: V.V.N. Simha Rao posing at Sileru river which divides Andhra and Orissa states of India

Prof: V.V.N. Simha Rao and Prof; Ratan Mulchandani with children in Madguru Elementary school on 15th December, 2011.

Children busy with toys

Tribes and Bamboo Resources

BAMBOO RESOURCES AND TRIBALS:
To find out the impact of bamboo extraction by ITC – BPL for pulp and paper from the forest areas on the local tribal communities, Gulletiwada Village was selected, since two tribal communities were found to coexist.
Gulletiwada is a small village situated at about 21 kms from Chinturu(Figure) , in the range of BCM(S) division, The village is situated in the interior area of rekapalli reserve forest area, not accessible by public transport mode.  To approach this village one has to use a two wheeler or depend upon the lorries which go to the bamboo coupes.  This village has 84 houses, with population of 247 koyas and 97 kondareddies.
Koyas are settled agriculturists practice “Chelaka Podu” and collect NTFP’s during the season, and these products are sold at Girijana Cooperative Society Chinturu and its outlets.  Major NTFP’s of the area are honey and gums of sterculias, Acacias, Terminalias which are collected during monsoon period.  They daily go to foreset for the collection of fire wood andy they hunt any animal which comes in the way which become their delicious meal for the day. 
Konda reddies are primitive tribe of the region generally prefer staying at Hill tops where the water sources are available on the basis of physical features.  Kondaredies habitat can be divided into three distinct zones.
1). The Hill settlements   2) The riverside settlement      3). The Settlements of the lower Agency tract and Plains.
Only during the last ten years Kondareddies came in contact with the outside world, mainly due to the extraction of bamboo as raw material for paper industry  but their major work being the preparation of articles out of bamboo.  These articles are sold(only to outsiders and in weekly markets) otherwise they generally barter their products for millets, pulses, grams, rice , chilies etc.
Tribals have their own classification of the bamboo stand (D. strictus) which is as follows (personal communication from Konda Reddi and Koyas).
1).  MODATI POTU                       : These are the tender bamboo of 4-6cm gbh which are thin
                                                                  to medium size, cut at bottom and used for sugarcane
  props and hut building.
2).  MEDARA VEDURU              : This is a medium thickness of 8-12 cm ghb generally                                                                       used for basket making.  The most important                                                                       requirement is that outer skin should be intact.
3).  BARU VEDURU                     :  Its of medium thichness with 13-16 cm gbh used for
   House construction and also used for toddy                        collection.
4).  KANNATHI                              :  It is usually of 18 cm gbh in girth of shorter lengths,                                                        used for afters in house building.
5).  KAVADI BADDALU              :   Split “ Bambusa aruddinacia “ used as shoulder                                                                                 shafts to Carry loads. About 250 go to a cart load.
6.) THOTA GEDALU                 :   Used for pushing and manouvaring boats and are                                                         thick  and in full length (D. Strictus)
7).  MULUKOLA KARRALU:  This sticks of D. Strictus used for goading cattle.                                                                                About 1,200 go to a card load.
Bamboo required for the preparation of various articles are tender in nature i.e. one year old culms.  Only for few articles two year old culms are used (Table –  ) for the purpose of collecting bamboo, Kondareddis leave for the forest during the early hours of the day and return bank by late afternoons or some times even during evening.  This work is generally done by women and men assist when they are having Leisure, other wise the latter take care of agriculture and hunting.  The bamboo they search for is generally 12-16 m tall and with a gbh of 14 cms.  The collected bamboo is brought to their homes and are split open into 4-6 long cuts and then further processed into small thin flakes using a special hand made platform and a sickle like instrument and then are allowed to get dried up for one to two days (two day drying makes articles more stiffer).  Then the flakes are moistened with water for softening and sewn to get a desired shape of the article.  Subsequently, these are subjected to smoke to obtain better durability.  The finished articles, ready for sale  are taken to weekly market centers.  These are bartered to the locals i.e. Koyas mainly, where bartering rate differes according to article and size.
In addition for making articles, those tribal communities use bamboo for various other purposes, as follows:
  • Use it for making houses where walls, doors are made up of bamboo and the house roof is thatched with phoenix leaves.  Then the entire house is spread with mud coating.
  • Use the cut portion of a bamboo culm  i.e. upto 2nd node for cooking meat.  They fill the cut culm with meat, cover the culm opening with a leaf and bake it in fire.  It is said that meat cooked in this manner tastes better than the traditional cooking.  Now families as BONGU CHICKEN in Maredumilly area of East Godavari District.
  • Use long bamboo culms as ladder.  The bamboo culms are tied to the palmyra tree tree which have less gbh, so that they can get effective grip while climbing (Plage – 19).
Long tender bamboo culms preferably Bambus Arundinaces (Mullu veduru, Telugu Vern.) are used for toddy trapping After harvesting the bamboo its outer skin is peeled out and allowed to dry for 1-2 days then,  it is cut at each node, cleaned and then baked in fire to get a fine finish.  They prefer culms of gbh more than 30 cms.  This processed bamboo culm is then used for collection of toddy which has a special taste and hence fetches the higher price in comparison to other collection materials unfortunately, this bamboo is locally extinct any they have to be imported form Maredmilli (East Godawar) forests.  This has led to the replacement of Bambus arudinacea with D. Strictus for toddy trapping leading to slight bitter taste and hence reduced income.
From discussions with the tribal people, it was evident that they were facing severe shorage of Bamboo (D. Strictus)as indicated by the longer distance they have to travel now (2 – 4 Kms) to collect bamboo in comparison to 50 m.  about six to seven years back.  They feel that the entry of ITC – BPL in the harvesting scene has led to this problem.  Even though the entry of ITC – BPL has provided a source of income as they do go as labour for felling bamboo during felling period, road repair works for coupes,  it cannot be denied that the traditional bamboo crafts earn extra income especially during the dry season.  They complain that the outside labour brought by ITC – BPL from elsewhere (from M.P., Orissa and East Godawari Dists) simply chop off all culms of the clump, and they cut the culms in a  “ V ” shape as being easier for them.  This can result in accumulation of water leading to fungal growth, making culms more prone to pest attack ultimately leading to the early death.
The Indiscriminate felling of forest tree in the reserve forest area for podu cultivation along with reduced fallow period has led to loss of vegetal coger in the slppes, obviously leading to soil erosion and nutrient loss.  When they were asked why they cannot avoid this type of cultivation, they simply say “ Provide us land we will stop podu ” and blame government authorities who come with many promises providing land etc. but never implement any.
Bamboo requirement for the Kondareddis is according to their family size.  If the family size above 5 members they requires 10 bamboo per week and family size below 5 members require 5 bamboo per week.  So according to the current population estimate, it could be calculated that kondareddies required about 8064 tender culms per year for their regular earning.   So as to continue their traditional practice.  However, this practive is gradually vanishing, as the younger generation takes prefers to go as daily wage labour or couple labor for quick money, especially in the past seven years.  Money provided by the ITC – BPL authorities seem to keep the tribals happy as they are paying a flat rate of Rs. 225/- for a stack with size of 2m X 2m.  Hence, there is an immediate threat that the skilled workers who can make specialized articles like square shaped winnowers, Common winnowers, grain storage bins will decline in numbers.  For instance, the study village today has only six skilled workers out of which three are above 75 years of age.
A major change which was noticed in the tribal communities of the village was shift in dietary habits.  As of now kondareddies and koyas have given up eating tubers, wildroots, mango kernels.  Now there have become the dry period food stuffs.  Due to flow of cash and also availability of credit from the merchants, during cutting season rice which in the past was a rare delicacy has now become the staple food.  Besides consumption of rice, the consumption of dried fish, and tobacco is also taking place.
During rainy season tender bamboo culms are delicacy which is made into a vegetable curry tasting like cabbage. Now this is being avoided as it is causing allergic complaints.
A Interesting cultural interaction can be seen between the Koyas and Kondareddies.  Koyas go for marrainge of Kondareddis and also lunch with them but Kondareddis though atted koyas marriages they don’t eat in there houses because koyas eat beef.  This cultural interaction is seen only at places where tribal coexist whereas at other places they do not interact culturally.
TABLE – VARIATION IN CLUMP MOUNDING AT DIFFERENT STUDY SITES IN
                     IN BHADRACHALAM (S) DIVISION
SITE NAME
TOTAL NUMBER OF CLUMPS
CLUMPS MOUNDED
%
Forest Dept
321
28
8.72
ITC – BPL
2,105
486
23.08
                               
TABLE – VARIATION IN CULMS CUTTING SHAPE AT DIFFERENT STUDY
                 SITES IN BHADRACHALAM(SOUTH) DIVISION.
SITE NAME
TOTAL CULMS FELLED
‘V’ SHAPE CUTTINGS
%
CROSS CUTTINGS
%
Forest Dept
2,408
1,624
67.44
784
32.55
ITC – BPL
22,193
17,612
79.35
4,581
20.64


TABLE: VARIATIONS IN NODAL CUTTINGS & CLEAR FELLED CULMPS BETWEEN DIFFERENT STUDY SITES
SITE NAME
CLUMPS PRESENT
CLUMPS HARVESTED AT
CLUMPS CLEAR FELLED
%
1ST Node
%
2nd Node
%
3rd Node
%
4th Node
%
FOREST DEP
321
32
9.65
120
37.38
144
44.85
25
7.78
68
21.18
ITC – BPL
2105
64
3.04
783
37.18
1232
58.52
26
1.23
382
18.14


TABLE –    BAMBOO REQUIREMENT OF KONDAREDDIS
No. of Family
Males
Females
Children
Total Family Members
Bamboo Requirement per week
1
1
2
3
6
10
2
1
1
4
6
10
3
1
1
1
3
5
4
1
2
1
4
5
5
2
1
1
4
5
6
1
1
2
4
5
7
1
1
1
3
5
8
2
0
1
3
5
9
2
2
2
6
10
10
1
1
4
6
10
11
1
1
2
4
5
12
2
2
1
5
5
13
1
2
2
5
5
14
1
1
1
3
5
15
1
1
0
2
5
16
1
1
3
5
5
17
2
1
2
5
5
18
1
2
6
9
10
19
1
1
1
3
5
20
1
1
2
4
5
21
2
0
0
2
5
22
2
2
1
5
5
TOTAL
29
27
41
97
168
BAMBOO REQUIRED PER WEEK        =      168  CULMS
BAMBOO REQUIRED PER MONTH     =      672  CULMS
BAMBOO REQUIRED PER YEAR         =     8064 CULMS


TABLE   –     MAKING BAMBOO ARTICLES –   SOME BASIC DETAILS
Sl. No
Article(English Name)
Telugu Name/Local
Amount of Bamboo required
No. of Products obtained
Age of Culm
Bartering Value
Market Value in Rs.
Rice in Peddy Kgs
Sorghum in Kgs
1
Winower(Small)  Winower(big)
Chatalu
Chatalu
1
1
2
1
One
One
4
5
3
4
6-8/-
2
Square Shapped Winower
Dangger
1
1
One
5
4
810/-
3
Bazaar Basket
Bazar Butta
1
1
One
5
4
8-10/-
4
Matteress (Small)
Matteress (Big)
Chapa
Chapa
2
4
1
1
One
One
10
20
7
18
12-15/-
25-30/-
5
Matteress (Small)
Matteress (Big)
Tirri(big)
Tirri(Small)
1.5
1
1
1
One
One
5
5
4
4
8-10/-
6-10/-
6
Umbrella
Gudugu/Erku
2
1
One
10
8
25-30/-
7
Boundary Walls
Tadikelu
15
1(3*3m)
Two
10
8
30-35/-
8
Storage Bins(Small)
Storage Bins(Medium)
Storage(Big)
Gampalu
Gampalu
Gampalu
1
1
1
2
2
1
One
One
One
3
4
5
2
3
4
6-10/-
8-10/-
10-12/-
9
Fish Basket
Chapa butta
1
4
One
1
1
5/-
10
Grain Storage Bins
Godi/Gummi
15
1(400Kgs)
One
50
35
100-150/-
11
Cradle
Vuyala
2
1
One
10
8
25-30/-
12
Sieve
Jaladi
2
1
One
6
4
5-8/-










CONCLUSION:
The Present Study clearly reveals that regeneration is more affected at the ITC-BPL site, in comparison to Forest Dept. site.  This is due to apparent negligence of management practices like mounding and clear felling of the clumps by the former.  Over harvesting should be avoided at both the sites (more so for Forest Dept.) as other –wise, days are not far off to see bamboo in Botanical gardens.  Prasad and Gadgil(undated) say that bamboo available to the paper mills in India has been overestimated and this has resulted in practices of clear felling of clumps leading to sharp decline of bamboo resources.  The present study has also indicated a similar trend i.e. previous to industrial extraction; the tribals were getting the bamboo for their requirements in less time and also by traveling less distance.  Hence, appropriate sustainable harvesting and management strategies have to be adopted by both ITC-BPL and Forest Department as it has been already discussed in.

FELLING IMPACT ON REGENERATION OF BAMBOO (DS) IN EASTERN GHATS

 BACKGROUND AND ORGIN OF THE STUDY:
In 1994 I was selected as Member of DISTRICT PARYAVARANA VAHINI OF Khammam (chaired by the District Collector) District to work on Environment issues in Khammam district. My concern and special interest is forest. One day while I am travelling through forest area I suddenly observed good ventilation that a particular area was clear felled. On my clear observation I found that it is Bamboo Coupe where ITC-Bhadrachalam Paper Mill collects Bamboo. I noticed that quite a number of trees (miscellaneous) growths were felled while collecting Bamboo from Clump. To my surprise the BPL has no right to cut the other trees except Bamboo. I studied the relevant documents of Forest Department Working Plan and Agreement made between APFD and ITC-BPL. I am afraid that if ITC-BPL continues like this, Bamboo will be completely vanish/ruined and sufferers will be local tribals. I made a complaint to DISTRICT PARYAVARANA VAHINI that ITC-BPL is not following silvicultural operations and causing damage to Bamboo regeneration as well as felling other miscellaneous trees around the Bamboo clumps. Complaint was well taken by the Convener Sri.Nalini Kumar the then Divisional Forest Officer, Khammam division, but he informed the complaint matter to Sri. Sheshagiri Rao, The Deputy Forest Manager, ITC-BPL to “convince” me. The DFM called me to his office and discussed with me, saying that my observations/statements are false. He requested me not to complain to the higher officers if any such things happen. He expressed his readiness to visit coupes along with me to show the coupes and asked me, if anything wrong with field staff should brought to his notice for correction. There ends my complaint.  Then I thought it should be taken seriously and ITC-BPL is not a small company to advise something for conservation of our Bamboo forests. I shared my concern with forest lovers in donor agencies and got support from SOCIETY FOR PROMOTION OF WASTELANDS DEVELOPMENT (SPWD) through Mr. Ramesh Chakravarthi, Senior Project Officer. The whole study guided by Dr.SN Shabbeer, Project Officer, SPWD, New Delhi.
Text Box:  AS WE AFRAID AND OUR STUDY IN 1995 REVEALED THAT TODAY THERE IS NO BAMBOO REMAINED IN OUR FOREST AND LOCAL PEOPLE ARE SUFFERING EVEN FOR THEIR DOMESTIC NEEDS. A.P.FOREST DEPARTMENT ALSO LOST A BIG INCOME FROM NATURALLY REGENERATED BAMBOO COUPES. ITC-BPL (Now PSPD) IS SUCCESSFULLY GENERATED PRIVATE PLANTATIONS (EQALIPTUS) FOR THEIR PRODUCTION. THIS MONOCULTURE PRACTICE IS ALSO MAKING OUR FARMER LANDS UNFERTILE.
Photograph taken in 1995-96 died clump of Bamboo

Dr. S.N.Shabeer, Project Officer, SPWD, Planning the Study project.
 
                                                                                     
  Clear felled Bamboo clump
Introduction: Badrachalam South Forest Division lies in the eastern part of Khammam District, between latitudes 170 27’ 42’’ and 170 54’ 05’’ N and longitudes 810 05’ 45’’ and 810 48’ 47’’ E. The Geographical Area of the Division is 1737.52 Km2, which is 10.84 % of the geographical area of the District. The main rivers of the division are Godavari, Sabari, Sileru.The Godavari river forms the southern boundary and Sileru river forms
northern boundary of the division.
HARVESTING PRACTICES FOLLOWED BY   ITC-BPL, SARAPAKA
 The Indian Tobacco Company – Bhadrachalam Paper Boards Limited (ITC-BPL) has made an agreement with Andhra Pradesh Forest Department (APFD) to COLLEECT 60,000 Mt tones of Bamboo per year (@Rs. 835/- Per Mt Tone as royalty) from regenerated Forest of Khammam district from 1991 to 1997 working season. The ITC – BPL have to follow the agreed conditions while collection of Bamboo from forests to improve regeneration growth of Bamboo in the natural forests making sustainable utilization of natural resources.
The Bhadrachalam  (South) Division has 4 ranges…Kunavarm, V.R.Puram, Chinturu and Lakkavara. In each range 4 series of coupes allotted to ITC –  BPL, every year one series will be worked out for Bamboo collection likewise the same area will be allotted after 3 years of working season, by that time the Bamboo will regenerate for collection.
Bhadrachalam division has 3 species of Bamboo. Most prevailing Bamboo is “Dendrocolumas Stricktos” which is called as SADHANAM by native tribes. This species of Bamboo will start production from the 6th year and will continue giving bamboo up to the age of 40-50 years at the rotation of every 3 years. Thus we can collect Bamboo from same clump 12 to 15 times; we can collect more produce if we follow the silvicultural operation stipulated by foresters. The agreed conditions of Silvicultural operations as follows are to strictly followed by the ITC-BPL.
The Lessee (ITC-BPL) will have to carry out silvicultural operations, wherever they do extraction operation for improvement of the Bamboo forests.
1.        Culm of less than one year age shall not be felled.
2.       At least Six Culms Clump of one year old well spaced-out in the Culm shall be retained.
3.       All Clumps shall be worked from inside-out in a horse shoes shaped design in the clump.
4.      Felling of clump permitted to be extracted being maintained to be not below the second node from ground level and in any case not higher than 30 cm. from ground level.
5.       Felling is prohibited from July to September. The Bamboo year starts in October and ends by June every year.
6.      Removal of Huygens for walking sticks is strictly prohibited.
7.       If there are only six or less in number, the clump shall not be worked.
8.      Deboris shall be dumped the nearest low lying area.
9.      The soil will be worked around the Bamboo Clumps and put in the shape of a mound over the clump to a height of 0.50 to 1.00 mtrs.
10.     Fire protection measures will be taken whenever needed.
The above conditions/ guidelines were agreed by the ITC – BPL for execution as mentioned in the AGREEMENT and also prescribed Silviculture requirements of working plan ( Volume Np.1, Page No. 352)
On a general observation, we find that, the regeneration of Bamboo growth is heavily affecting due to the non compliance of agreed silviculture operation by ITC-BPL. We made complaint to the concerned forest official for necessary action but, in vain. We discussed this issue with SPWD (Society for Promotion of Wastelands Development). New Delhi and seeked their cooperation and support. They agreed to support the study. We proposed to conduct a study in all the areas worked out by ITC-BPL for Bamboo collection during 1994-95.
We got approval for our study in 4 ranges of Bhadrachalam (South) Division from the Divisional Forest Officer, collected all coups maps of allotted areas to BPL during 1994-95. 4 members of our survey team was attended the training programme on study and started survey from August to November, 1995. Our survey team made camps in every coupe. We selected area wise plots having 200 sq.mtrs. (40*50) quadrate and with the help of survey Proforma the team members noted down the stipulated information for study the final data of the study is as follows.
ABSTRACT
SI.NO
Name of the Range and Coupe
Total area Ha.
No. of Quadrates
No. of Clumps
Cross cutting
‘V’ shape cutting
Left Bamboo less than 1 year
Tender Bamboo Left
V.R.Puram
1
West B.C.1
8,631
8
283
1017
2247
557
220
2
E.B.C.1
1,246
4
136
290
875
129
168
Mothugudem
3
S.B.C.1
5,097
10
321
784
1624
819
114
4
C.B.C 1
1,014
5
194
513
1103
710
116
Chinturu
5
S.B.C 1
6,449
10
421
504
3992
1077
119
Kunavarm
6
6
S.B.C 1
3,692
10
345
802
2914
452
276
7
W.B.C 1
4,997
10
374
569
3867
1024
118
8
E.B.C 1
3133
10
352
886
2614
348
402
TOTAL:
34259
67
2426
5365
19236
5116
1533
We have conducted survey in 8 bamboo coupes of 34,259 Ha. By making 67 quadrates an area of 13.4 Ha. Total number of clumps surveyed are 2,426 in which we find one side (proper) cuttings, 5,365 and two side( improper) cuttings 29,236 (these clums will not regenerate). The ITC-BPL have to leave all tender Bamboos but, they left only 1,533 bamboos. There is no scope for regeneration of Bamboo. The totals left out matured Bamboos are 5,116. But, the BPL has to leave at least six Bamboos for each clump. Thus, for 2,426 clumps the BPL should leave 14,556. We hardly find two matured Bamboos in each clump instead of six as agreed. Hence, there will be no regeneration of Bamboos will happen in these clumps. Simultaneously, there is no one clump is seen which is cleared after felling by removing the dried branches leaves. We find lot of wastages of Bamboo Sticks. The ITC-BPL has not followed horse shoe method of clump working at even place. And there is no proper mounding is done for all the clumps. They do only on the both sides of the roads of inspection.
The ITC-BPL has made a statement during their workshop in September 1995 on “Raw Materials Management” conducted for Junior Forest Managers and declared…… “By 2000 A.D they are in need of 55 lakh M.Ts. of Bamboo for production, but the existing availability estimation is 33 lakh M.Ts. Thus, there is a shortfall of 22 lakh Metric Tonnes”  Source: Training Material circulated during workshop
 


                                                               
Bamboo transportation and Bamboo Depot
The Section officer of Forest Department has to visit the working coupe in every 3 months and report findings to the concerned Forest Range Officer. The Forest Range Officer has to ratify the section officer’s report and submit the same to Divisional Forest Officer (DFO). The D.F.O is authorized to fix penalty and collect. The Forest Department has to verify all cuttings and conditions of the coupe area before taking it back. And the BPL is responsible to report fire accidents and thefts in the forest area allotted to them. But, nothing was seems to done in accordance with the above. The Department officials and BPL Staff is mixed with each other and all the irregularities of BPL are ignored as favour.
SUGGESTIONS MADE AFTER STUDY IN 1995:
·         The felling labor well educated on the merits and demerits of felling procedure, strict supervision will be arranged.
·         The ITC-BPL should follow all the agreed conditions in operation of Bamboo coupes.
·         The Felling Cycle System should follow at 4 years interval instead of 3 years (Dr. Nooruddin Khan, ACF, Working plan 1948-58 FWPP-181).
·         The mounding should do for all the clumps worked.
·         The ITC-BPL staff should careful in supervising the working operations.
·         The Forest Department should supervise as stipulated in the Agreement and working plan.

 

Unionization of Youth Loading labor in Chinturu Mandal


UNIONISATION OF YOUTH LOADING LABOUR  IN CHINTURU MANDAL
INTRODUCTION:
The CHINTURU Mandal formed on 20.5.1985 and  this Tribal area consists of  15 Grama Panchayaths.  Its borders are Chattisgadh and Orissa towards north, V.R.Puram Mandal towards the south, East Godawary towards the East and Bhadrachalam Mandal towards the West. Eastern Chinturu was separated from its western part by the river Sabari.
The total population according to 2011 census is 45,401.  Out of this the Tribal Population is 78.01% the SC population 15% and the others 6.99%. The Mandal has spread into 118 villages of 15 Grama Panchayaths. The Tribals of this area are Koyas, Kondareddies and Naiks.  It is hilly area covered with thick forests containing more than 30varieties of commercially important trees.  The average rain fall is 900 to 1100 mm.   The state highway from Khammam to Bhadrachalam passes through Chinturu and to Visakhapatnam and Rajahmudry.  Besides the river Sabari the other tributary rivers which merge with SABARI in the mandal are Sileru and Sokileru. Sabari flows towards west side of this part of Chinturu and Joins in Godawari River at Kunavaram (this was where Sabari offered sweet fruits to the Lord Sri. Rama, according to Ramayana.)  Few nontribal farmers migrated to Sabari belt area for cultivation they gradually occupied major part of this area on lease basis.  Three Hydroelectric power projects are there on Seleru river in Andhra Pradesh, Polluru in Khammam district, Donkarai in East Godavari and Upper Seleru in Visakha Dist and Chitrakonda in Orissa.
ACTIVITY:
This year Governments has been started huge and number of development programmes in Chinturu Mandal under different schemes. Under these schemes there are construction of Buildings, Check Dams, Roads and Tanks etc; etc given to the Contractors and sub Contractors.  All these constructions need construction raw material which is available cheaply from nearby river and forest areas i.e. Sand, Loose soil, Red soil,Gravel, Metal and Wood-Cement, Iron etc; requires lot of transporting. Contractors get supply of sand and soils from near Sabari RIVER by the local suppliers/transporters.
It is estimated that nearly 100 Tractors are supplying the Sand, Soil, and Metal to the constructions in the Mandal. In this context the following factors were observed for intervention:
TRANSPORTERS/OWNERS OF TRACTOR:
*       Among the 100 Tractors estimated in the Chinturu Mandal only 20% trucks have the legal documents.
*       Only 20 % of vehicle Drivers has Driving Licenses.
*       No Insurance coverage to Loading Labor or Drivers.
*       There is no Union for the owners of Trucks.
TRACTOR DRIVERS:
*       Only 20% Truck Drivers has Driving License.
*       Wage @Rs.70/- per day (excluding Beta) + 5/- Beta per trip.
*       No Drivers Union.
*       Irregular/delay/no payment of wages /salaries by Owners.
*       No risk coverage or Insurance.

 

 


LOADING AND UNLOADING LABOR:
*       100 Tractors working with  100 JATTUs nearly 600 to 700 laborers hailing  from 12 villages around Chinturu ( Each JATTU consists of 6 to 8 members)
*        Most of the laborers are teenage Tribal girls (dropouts).
*       More chances of girl trafficking.
*       No Insurance to Laborers.
*       There are incidences which are not noticed by anybody.
*       No risk coverage or Insurance.
Payment details of loading labor:
Sl. No.
Loading Material
Loading Charges per trip
Distance
No. of trips per day
Average wage per day INR
1.
SAND
100/-
Local
8 to 10
100/- to 120/
2.
LOOSE/RED  SOIL
100/-
Local
8 to 10
3.
Metal
150/-
Local
8 to 10
4.
SAND/SAND/SOIL
250/-
Outside (35Kms)
3 to 4
*Loading Labor  leave house at 8.00 a.m. and reach back at 7.00 p.m.
*      Very few owners pay weekly payments (20%).
*      Majority of Tractor Owners pay after they get payment or very late.
*      Labor used to make rounds to the owner house for payment.
*      There are incidences of nonpayment.
*      Less treatment benefits in accidents.
*      IGNORANCE OF WELFARE SCHEMES OF UNORGANISED SECTOR.
Asha (Association for Social and Humanize Action) has conducted a field study during the month of August, 2011 observed above facts and thought to organize a meeting with Youth for unionization of loading labor at Mandal level.
Asha workers met all the loading Jattus in surrounding 12 villages and explained the need of unionization. On 15th August, 2011 Asha organized Youth Festival and a meeting with all the Loading labor in Mandal. 122 tribal youth attended the meeting cum event (Most of the youth are girls between the age group of 15 to 18 years) where the idea of unionization is discussed in length. All the members agreed to form into a Group and propose to meet weekly on every Wednesday. Wednesday is Sandy day here in Chinturu Mandal Head Quarter and all labor gets their payment on this day.
The meeting resolved that Asha should make Draft guidelines, Rules and Regulations for the Mandal level Union. Members proposed to Name the Union in next meeting. An idea is evolved among the group to make some amount of thrift in every month.
Asha wish to organize this group as organized Sector and entitle the members for all provisions of Government.
We seek cooperation from supporters to continue the process of unionization.

 



                   

VEDURUKI ROGAMOCHINDI (BAMBOO GOT DESEASE)

VEDURUKI ROGAMOCHINDI
(BAMBOO GOT DISEASE)
 
This boy Mr. Kadala Narsimha Reddy on 29th of July, 2011 came to our Cell shop. My younger son runs a Cell shop from where Narsimha Reddy purchased a Cell phone Brand Lephone (China Mobile) he brought the Cell for repair. Today I happened to sit in the shop counter since, my son gone outside for purchasing. And my elder son went to his office, so I forced to go and sit in the counter. Usually I didn’t go there. Observing the boys face thought He is from PTG village, I started conversation with him. The essence of the conversation is as follows:
Mr.Kadala Narsimha Reddy living in China thogu ( a village situated on a series of Hills) on the way to Kamanthogu a PTG (Primitive Tribal Group) Konda Reddy village. He answered to the question there are only 3 houses in their village. He never went to school, now he denying to go to school or camp. His brother Latchi Reddy only the boy who studied upto 2nd class in the village  Very recently our Project Officer walked up to the hills to meet the PTG people. He is very kind to sanction several schemes for the welfare and development of Konda Reddy. It become passion to every young Officer, particularly P.O.s of ITDAs visit Konda Reddy villages and make many promises to change their lives and attempt to ‘mainstreaming’ them. I am observing from several years, quite a number of P.O.s visited the Konda Reddy villages and made lot of efforts and money to do good to them. At last some Koda Reddy families were forcedly convinced to come down to Maddigudem and Boddugudem tribal villages and they were allotted sufficient land and developed that land, provided water facility and tractor in Maddigudem village. Unfortunately the scene is same as in the beginning. Many times I am wondering that money is poured like water and Government is committed to develop the PTG, but in vain. What is the reason behind? I some time feel that These are all might not be their felt needs”.
I just asked the boy. Are you going for hunting? How many bow & arrows in your village? To my shock he replied, no we are not going for hunting and we have no Bow & Arrows?  Reason is that Bamboo is not available to make Bow & arrow and is completely vanished. Now new shoots are coming.  “VEDURUKI ROGAM VOCHINDI”.  I asked if any animal come in the Night how they protect themselves, replied we have banda katti. He worried that girls are dying in their villages. He has two sisters and two brothers. His parents died. His elder brother take care of the family members.

Please go through the below two Press clippings (color and white and black) about PTG Development initiatives and impact.

THE HINDU 20th July, 2011

EENADU on 25th July, 2011